KERALA
The state of Kerala is affluent in a range of artistic handicrafts. The state has a rich cultural heritage, which is depicted in its art and crafts. The articles available here ranges from ayurvedic soaps, balms, wood carving, woven fiber baskets, mats and curios and much more. Each of these Kerala handicrafts showcases decade old traditions. Even the temples of Kerala include many crafts of metal alloys made out of a mixture of brass, tin and copper, which create popular tower-like lamps.
The various Kerala handicrafts available include Brass and Bell Metal Works, Coir and Cane Products, Ivory Works, Lacquer Ware, Sandalwood Carving, Textiles, Wooden Toys, Kathakali Masks, and Wood Carving amongst others
WOODCRAFT 
Wood craft of Kerala is regarded as one of the ancient art forms. The temples and churches of Kerala are abounding in woodcarvings. Different items of furniture such as chairs, table settees, sofas, almirahs, cots, radio castings etc., and models of animals and deities, toys and Kathakali accessories produced by Kerala craftsmen are very much in demand. The models of caparisoned elephants and the carvings of Kathakali dance-dolls are other items of huge demand. Interestingly, the craftsmen of Kerala have produced a large variety of handicrafts by using the rich wealth of flora of the state.
Like the wood-sculpture in the Catholic and Jacobite churches of Kerala, their great heritage of wood-carving also continues to remain practically unknown to the larger world. Some of these churches have many artistic items of wood-carving. The variety of their designs, ranging from naturalism to abstraction and making fine use of the motif of the vine has an important place in Christian symbolism.Wood Craft of Kerala Miniature pillars on the altar panels sometimes show the ascending convolutions of the vine along with figurative representations. Several other churches also have beautiful pulpits.
A traditional furniture masterpiece made of wood with neatly shaped overall design and rich decoration is the cot in the Padmanabhapuram palace. The legs and the posts that carry the canopy look like living budding plant-stems because of their supple carving. Old wood screens harmonise in their design the neat, geometric shapes of openings and the undulating rhythms of decorative motifs carved on the panels. Teak and rosewood continue to be popular and the artisans are making furniture of modern design